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Sport Management

Finding strong popular sources

Your forum assignments require you to find academic and popular sources to respond to questions from your instructor.

This page will help you:

  • distinguish credible popular sources
  • utilize Library databases to access credible popular sources

Evaluating popular sources

In university, we usually distinguish between scholarly and popular sources. Sometimes, instructors require you to only use academic sources e.g. peer-reviewed books and articles. In Sport Management, you will often be requested to use both scholarly and popular sources. In broad strokes, we define popular sources as publications created for a general audience, usually written by journalists or subject experts but not by professors or researchers.    Magnifying glass and paper

Some examples of popular sources useful for SPMA 4P97:

  • articles from newspapers such as The Globe and Mail 
  • videos from news sites such as CBC.ca
  • industry reports e.g. a publication from Hockey Canada 
  • trade publications e.g. Hockey News

How can you tell if you're using a "good" popular source? Sometimes it's tricky to know if you're looking at a credible article, an inaccurate opinion piece - or even fake news.

Some tips for selecting credible popular sources:

  • Authority - ask yourself what credentials or experience the author has to speak on this topic
  • Accuracy -- has the information been reviewed for accuracy?
    • Most news sites edit and review material before publishing; blogs and non-journalism websites may not
  • Purpose - what is the purpose of the source? Is it trying to inform, entertain, or sell something? 
    • Is the information fact, opinion or propoganda?
  •  Date - if you need up-to-date information, watch that you're not using a source that's outdated

 

Links to credible popular sources

News sources

Trade publications

Trade publications and magazines are included in many Library databases including SuperSearch, Canadian Business and Current Affairs, Factiva and more. 

Some specific titles relevant to hockey:

Industry reports